oral care advice

Two Peas In a Pod: Why Brushing and Flossing Come Hand-in-Hand

Dental Advice | Dental Care | Dental Health | Gums
Two Peas In a Pod: Why Brushing and Flossing Come Hand-in-Hand

Brushing and Flossing, it’s a subject we deal with every time we go to the dentist. After a while, it begins to feel like white noise.

Sure, we all know that brushing is important, but flossing seems kind of redundant. Do we really need it? Why are both of them necessary?

In the next few paragraphs, we’ll try to break down the benefits of brushing and flossing and explain why you should be doing both. Read on to learn more.

The Weird World of Teeth

Dentistry can be potentially traced back to the ancient Egyptians, who were incredibly skilled as far as ancient doctors go. They were the first to understand that a broken bone could be set and would grow back together.

They also may have pioneered dentistry. Granted, that was a simpler time when a dental problem meant an untreated abscess or cavities from accidentally eating sand, and they couldn’t even cure that.

Let’s jump ahead a few thousand years to the mid-nineteenth century when the medical model now known as germ theory was becoming popular among the masses.

This brings us to today and the question of why flossing is important. Flossing and brushing combined help in the treatment of gingivitis, which is caused by bacteria. However, that’s not the only benefit.

It also helps to destroy other forms of plaque and bacteria, which could lead to more serious issues. In fact, your mouth can be thought of as the metaphorical canary in a coal mine.

Plaque in your mouth can potentially lead to a higher risk of heart disease, as well as mouth infections, which can spread to other areas of the body. Plus, paying close attention to your mouth can help you notice signs that might be a sign of another issue somewhere else in the body.

Brushing and Flossing

As great as toothbrushes are, they can’t do everything. Their shape is not particularly well-designed for cleaning in between teeth.

This helps to prevent bacteria from forming in the hard-to-reach areas of your mouth. It may seem like a hassle now, but in the long run, it can save a lot of money on dental procedures.

Plus, it helps to cure bad breath, and can even make your teeth appear whiter by cutting away particles you wouldn’t otherwise notice.

Oral Hygiene

It may seem like your dentist is beating a dead horse every time they talk to you about the benefits of brushing and flossing, but it is true. Brushing and flossing help cut down on plaque and bacteria, which can prevent a lot of problems later on.

Additionally, brushing and flossing can also help your mouth look better and smell better.

If you want to know more about dentistry and how to keep your mouth healthy, please visit our website. Maybe you have bleeding gums but aren’t sure why. We can help. Perhaps you want to know which foods you should avoid if you want to keep your teeth healthy.

Oral Care: Choosing the Right Toothbrush

Dental Advice | Dental Care

When it comes to choosing the right toothbrush, it can be a bit confusing because of the many sizes, colours, and types of bristle you can choose from. Throw the electric toothbrushes into the mix, and you can surely get lost in the dental aisle. The question becomes: “Which is the right toothbrush for you?” And the answer actually depends on your unique dental needs.

 

For Sensitive Teeth

A survey done by the Academy of General Dentistry stated that one in three dentists report that brushing with too much force is the number one cause of tooth sensitivity.

 

Many people believe that by using a hard or medium-bristled toothbrush, you get cleaner teeth, but in reality, those types of bristles do more harm than good. Hard and medium-bristled brushes are known to cause bleeding or receding gums as well as worn enamel that exposes the dentin, thus leading to tooth sensitivity.

 

Keep in mind that soft-bristled toothbrushes are always the best option and that soft bristles are just as effective as the hard or medium-bristled ones.

 

For People Who Grind Their Teeth at Night

Bruxism – teeth grinding and clenching – affects 1 in 3 people. The grinding process is similar to putting over a thousand pounds of pressure on the teeth and jaw. Ongoing teeth grinding can wear one’s teeth down to nubs and it also wears away the enamel, which can lead to extreme tooth sensitivity. This is why people who are suffering from bruxism need to use an extra soft-bristled toothbrush.

 

People with Arthritis or Limited Mobility

There are people, especially the elderly and those with limited mobility, who have a hard time getting to all their teeth using a manual toothbrush. Electric toothbrushes are a better option in this case. They have bristles that rotate in one direction and can be switched and moved to the opposite direction. They are more effective in terms of cleaning the teeth or those electric toothbrushes that only spin in a single direction.

 

People with Braces

Soft-bristled electric toothbrushes are great for people who wear braces. One study which had 21 patients who have orthodontic appliances found that those patients who used electric toothbrushes had significant improvement in plaque reduction in comparison to those who used manual toothbrushes.

 

If you do not have your personal dentist yet, be sure to reach out to us today! With Midtown Dental, you can be sure that your oral health will be taken care of and all your dental concerns handled only by the best!

Oral Care: Tips for the Elderly

Dental Advice | Dental Care

Our dental health is connected to our entire body. Any bacteria that lives and grows in your mouth can travel to the other parts of your body, thus, can contribute to problems with our overall health. Aging is a part of life, but it does not mean that you can’t do it gracefully and in the healthiest way possible!

 

Here are some great dental tips that can help you enjoy your golden years with healthy, happy smiles:

 

BRUSH AND FLOSS REGULARLY.

The common rule is you should clean your teeth at least twice a day. As you age, however, your mouth requires a little extra attention and time. After the age of 50, plaque builds up more quickly and it also becomes much more difficult to get rid of. This is why it is important to get in the habit of brushing your teeth after every meal. Make it a point to brush your teeth when you wake up and before going to bed. Consistent flossing is also essential and should be done after every meal.

 

USE AN ELECTRIC TOOTHBRUSH.

An electric toothbrush that has soft bristles is great for all ages, but more especially for seniors. This type of toothbrush comes with a built-in timer that ensures you brush for the correct amount of time. It is also helpful for seniors with arthritis, as the brush itself will take care of all the brushing. There will be no more worry about the up-and-down circular motions needed in order to thoroughly clean the teeth and gums – the electric toothbrush will do it all for you!

 

USE MOUTHWASH.

If you are looking for a great way to prevent cavities and to slow the buildup of plaque, then you should use mouthwash! However, you should be careful and avoid using too much mouthwash – you might upset the pH balance in your mouth. Rinsing with mouthwash once a day just before you go to bed would suffice. When choosing a mouthwash, go for an alcohol-free option for older adults. Alcohol can contribute to dry mouth.

 

CLEAN YOUR DENTURES DAILY.

Just like our teeth, dentures should be cleaned every day. The only difference is dentures should not be cleaned with toothpaste. Toothpaste will only damage your dentures as it is abrasive. Use products that are specifically designed to clean dentures. Be sure to also give your mouth frequent breaks from wearing your dentures. Take them out each day to help maintain healthy gums.

 

If you are a senior or someone you love is, and you want the best dentists who can help you take care of senior dental health, setup an appointment with one of our dental professionals today!